Shiraz E-Medical Journal

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Effects of Selenium Supplementation on Soluble FMS-Like Tyrosine Kinase-1 and Glutathione Peroxidase Levels and the Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1: Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-2 Ratio in Pregnant Women

Mina Mousavi 1 , Elahe Heidari 1 , Margaret P. Rayman 2 , Fatemeh Tara 3 , Hasan Boskabadi 4 , Shabnam Mohammadi 5 , 6 , Gholamali Maamouri 4 , Shima Tavallaie 1 , Mohammad Taghi Shakeri 1 , Majid Ghayour-Mobarhan 1 , 7 , * and Gordon Ferns 8
Authors Information
1 Biochemistry of Nutrition Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, IR Iran
2 Department of Nutrition and Metabolism, University of Surrey, Guilford, UK
3 Gynecology Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, IR Iran
4 Neonatal Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, IR Iran
5 Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Gonabad University of Medical Sciences, Gonabad, IR Iran
6 Neurogenic Inflammation Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, IR Iran
7 Cardiovascular Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, IR Iran
8 Division of Medical Education, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, UK
Article information
  • Shiraz E-Medical Journal: March 01, 2015, 16 (3); e21596
  • Published Online: March 31, 2015
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • Received: June 29, 2014
  • Revised: December 1, 2014
  • Accepted: February 7, 2015
  • DOI: 10.17795/semj21596

To Cite: Mousavi M, Heidari E, Rayman M P, Tara F, Boskabadi H, et al. Effects of Selenium Supplementation on Soluble FMS-Like Tyrosine Kinase-1 and Glutathione Peroxidase Levels and the Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1: Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-2 Ratio in Pregnant Women, Shiraz E-Med J. 2015 ; 16(3):e21596. doi: 10.17795/semj21596.

Abstract
Copyright © 2015, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
1. Background
2. Objectives
3. Materials and Methods
4. Results
5. Discussion
Acknowledgements
Footnote
References
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